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Windows 11 and TPM...


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Free upgrade if you meet the requirements...but what's TPM besides throttle,prop, mixture?

 

Did a Google but still a bit baffled... seems it's another chip you might have on your MOBO that would need turning on in your BIOS... extra security?...

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Hello,

it's a little chip that your motherboard may or may not have.

Mine does not and like all other computer chips, there are

none available, except a tiny number in the hands of greedy

people who want ten times its list price.

Windows 10 is apparently supported until 2025, so this is not

really a matter of urgency.

 

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1 minute ago, Nick Cooper said:

Hello,

it's a little chip that your motherboard may or may not have.

Mine does not and like all other computer chips, there are

none available, except a tiny number in the hands of greedy

people who want ten times its list price.

Windows 10 is apparently supported until 2015, so this is not

really a matter of urgency.

 

 

2015? ;)

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1 hour ago, Nick Cooper said:

However:

as since around 2015 virtually all Intel chipsets have it, you can enable Intel PTT in your

BIOS and then your PC will show as Windows 11 compatible.

Mine shows under Miscellaneous and is disabled by default.
 

 

 

Thanks Nick

 

This info listing from Microsoft might be of help for other members as well

It is a listing from Microsoft of all processors and the OS which they will support

 

If you drop down to Windows 11 you can further select either AMD , Intel or Qualcomm processors and you will then have 

a listing of all the respective chipsets that comply with the Windows 11 requirement.

 

Then as you suggest , one can go into the bios to enable TPM (Intel PTT) 

 

I hope this is of help

Cheers

Pete

 

Windows Processor Requirements | Microsoft Docs

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Just for info. 

 

It took only a few minutes on my machine to activate.  The only issue I had was to go to MSI's website as recommended by the

motherboard manual ( I  have a MSI Z390 MB) and download the Bios manual. 

 

I thought , oh no , not another lengthy manual. However it was extremely well organized with very clear pictorial instructions.

 

Booting into BIOS, activating TMP and restarting into Windows, and checking  the Security processor setting in Device security

to ensure the trusted platform module (TPM) was active was very quick, taking about a minute.

 

When you first do the check in Device Security , the window  pops up showing TMP not active  for a few seconds  and then the window disappears - a :o moment .

 

Clicking it again though, shows all the relevant info with TMP activated . The window closes normally  and all is good. :)

 

Cheers

Pete

@Nick Cooper

Edited by renault
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So, my  i7-6700K flies MSFS - plus the other sims - perfectly but isn't fit for Win 11. Besides, I don't have that Throttle-Propeller-Mixture (TPM) module on board and no TPM BIOS entry either. 

 

 

These requirements are highly questionable and might be revised at a point if MS wants users to adopt W11 (say, the remaining PC users left after all). Do any normal people know what a BIOS, let alone a TPM module is?

 

Kind regards, Michael

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32 minutes ago, pmb said:

Do any normal people know what a BIOS, let alone a TPM module is?

 

Exactly so Michael. As I've said in posts on the "other site", this is going to be a major problem going forward. I've been building computers for over 20 years now and until this came along I'd never heard of PTM or PTT. If M$ really thinks joe-average user can cope with this they aren't even as smart as some thinkle pink they are.

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8 minutes ago, Nick Cooper said:

Hello,

until today, I had not heard of a TPM but I have now and it seems that I do not need one after all.:)

 

I made the mistake of looking this up 

 

Trusted Platform Module Technology Overview (Windows 10) - Microsoft 365 Security | Microsoft Docs

 

The second sentence in  reads "A TPM chip is a secure crypto-processor that is designed to carry out cryptographic operations."

 I started thinking well without this , my  win10 PC is perfectly capable of "bricking itself" with a normal windows update. :(

 

With this , well.  one  update going wrong and my PC should be able to permanently disable itself for all time :rolleyes:

 

I am going weak at the knees just thinking about it :D:lol:

Cheers

Pete

 

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Two things of note with Windows 11

 

"Games will look better than ever thanks to Auto HDR, a unique capability we’re offering with Windows 11 which automatically adds High Dynamic Range (HDR) enhancements to games built on DirectX 11 or higher that previously only leveraged Standard Dynamic Range (SDR). HDR allows a supported game to render a much wider range of brightness values and colors, giving an extra sense of richness and depth to the image. We introduced this tech in our Xbox Series X|S consoles and got an outstanding response from creators and players. We’re excited to bring this groundbreaking technology to Windows 11. "

Windows 11: The Best Windows Ever for Gaming - Xbox Wire

 

" Windows 11 unlocks the full potential of your system’s hardware, putting some of the latest gaming technology to work for you. Like: DirectX 12 Ultimate, which can enable breathtaking, immersive graphics at high frame rates; "

Introducing Windows 11 | Windows Experience Blog

 

As far as I am aware  MS2020 for the XBoxX is based upon DirectX 12 Ultimate, not DirectX 12. It would make sense that only one version of DirectX 12 would be used for both the PC and Xbox versions rather than two different variants. 

 

But as with most things , "time will tell" as to what the actual rollout looks like later this year.

 

Cheers

Pete

 

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Based upon my personal experience today, after enabling TMP in bios .

 

Checking that TMP is active .....

 

The first check I ran was in Windows Security & checked that Security processor was active

 

TMP-small.png

 

At the bottom of the page in this link is a PC Health Check APP which will tell you if your system meets all the

Windows 11 minimum requirements. 

 

Upgrade to the New Windows 11 OS | Microsoft

 

After you install and run the app you will get the following message if you system meets all the requirements or if not, a list of reasons

why it doesn't .  Apparently your machine may not be upgradeable  even if you were able to enable TMP successfully.

 

TMP-2-small.png

 

Clicking on the Learn More button provides some further insight...

TMP-3-small.png

 

So it seems that one needs TPM version 2, a compatible 64 bit processor (previous link above) , UEFI, Secure Boot capable

and Windows Display Driver Model vers 2.x , which comes with Windows 10 and is a requirement of the OS 

 

UEFI boot mode is something I have a bit of "non positive" experience with.  When my machine was built, a mistake was made and

the Boot mode was set to legacy, rather than UEFI .  Win 10 requires UEFI so basically any system up to 2 yrs ago should have in enabled by default. 

 

In my case, it was relatively "easy" to fix by the builder as I only keep the OS on the C drive SSD. All applications are on other drives. 

I mentioned relatively easy , because to change it, required a system reinstall on a cleaned drive which was just a bit of time luckily.

 

I agree with Michael @pmband W2DR @W2DRthough .  This is much more convolved than just a simple OS upgrade and could be

daunting for the average user ,especially if a OS drive reinstall is necessary (I'm assuming many users have more than the OS on their boot drive).

 

Hopefully MS will have a much simplified approach when rollout for all users actually begins.

 

I hope this information is of help to my fellow members

Cheers

Pete

Edited by renault
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Hello,

though there is no confusion in this topic, there is elsewhere, in an effort to further clarify,

Windows 10 and no doubt Windows 11 see Intel PTT as TPM.

This means that a separate TPM chip is not required by anyone whose PC has Intel PTT.

A check of Windows 10 on my PC which does have Intel PTT and does not have a TPM chip, only an empty TPM header, reveals this:

 

5.jpg

 

Some people are also reporting that they have enabled PTT but that the Windows Health Check still reports that the PC is not compatible with Windows 11.

This is mainly due to the additional requirement of an Intel CPU that is at least 8 series and theirs are 7 series or earlier.

 

 

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Interesting reading your experience there Pete, I think we have similar if not the same boards, I sometimes wonder if some of these new thinks are brought on just to get more sales of components, I still don't really understand what TPM does, I would be keen to learn what W11 gives me on a more general basis to compared to 10.....

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4 hours ago, wain71 said:

just went into BIOS, updated to enable TPM, ran the app Pete showed us and all is good.....

Lucky bloke!   My i7-975 and 2012 system,  is blowing bubbles...   I'm not interested in shelling our for a new MB and CPU, just to run W11. So...as long as W10 can run...even if it no longer gets updates...it is, what it is....

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Sounds like windows 8 all over again. MS aren't stupid they know that this limit will cripple the take up of W11 and will doubtless provide a work around or alternative  else they won't get all the new 'sexy' features engaged with their customers.  I too have PTT and 7 series showing not compatible and am not likely to get too stressed by things. Interestingly even if I bought a TPM2 chip it looks like it won't work so are all those companies out ther going to trash their 7 series cpu's because of win 11 - no and similarly in the home/ entertainment area. Just be cool and wait until things work themselves out.....

 

 

 

 

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Hello,

I am not sure of the value of raising issues such as these.

As things stand, those of us who have a PC that complies with the current conditions are

able, if we choose to do so, to test out this new operating system.

Those whose PC or laptop do not comply cannot do so and are therefore only able to 

raise "issues" based on hearsay and personal opinion.

This achieves little beyond the spreading of rumours and speculation that help no one.

 

This topic raised the specific "issue" of the TPM and has been answered factually and in detail.

Many thanks to those who contributed.

 

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