Jump to content

This is well worth watching


Guest Colin M
 Share

Recommended Posts

Thanks Colin

A great film to watch:

 

Aviation - a lifelong passion.

NASA and space - a lifelong innovation and learning experience.

SOCAL - the BEST family holiday we ever had. Big Sur and everything else nearby - 3 weeks of “wow!”.

You’ve made my day - thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back in the days when the 747's were still new and unfamiliar to most of us, my mother bought a ticket to Europe. She later cancelled the trip because she learned there was a piano in the upstairs lounge and she was afraid the airplane would be too heavy to get off the ground. I swear this is a true story..........Doug

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, medx421 said:

747 can carry the weight of the Space Shuttle on its back, yet airlines charge for having a bag weigh over 50lbs :-)

 

1 hour ago, Sniper31 said:

 

Now that is one excellent point ;) 

It still comes down to fuel.  When I first went to weight and balance school for being a dispatcher we were told just one extra can of Coke per plane on the whole fleet would cost a million dollars that year in fuel.  We had to be very scrupulous in picking up all objects in the bag bins when working on the planes as even screws would add weight.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, medx421 said:

Eh I get it and don't get it at the same time.  Fees can be a little silly sometimes considering.  My comment was largely satirical.

I thought it was medx, and I agree with you 100%.  I remember when they used to actually weigh people.  I don't think they could do that today.

 

But on a 727 it was critical to weight and balance.  For the military we had duffle weights, 75 pounds.  People were 150 no matter how much you weighed.  It was all done with an algorithm but it worked.  I think it's just a way to squeeze every last cent out of the flying public but that's just my opinion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Jack Sawyer said:

I thought it was medx, and I agree with you 100%.  I remember when they used to actually weigh people.  I don't think they could do that today.

 

But on a 727 it was critical to weight and balance.  For the military we had duffle weights, 75 pounds.  People were 150 no matter how much you weighed.  It was all done with an algorithm but it worked.  I think it's just a way to squeeze every last cent out of the flying public but that's just my opinion.

Well, for the 28 years that I have been in the military (mostly in the mighty 101st), we have never once had our gear weighed getting on a helicopter. When it comes to deployment flights, they will weigh our extra baggage that gets palletized (basically they just weigh the pallet) but they don't weigh all of our gear and weaponry that we carry on. And trust me, we carry much more than the average traveler with a 70lb suitcase. The typical modern day combat soldier carries over 150 lbs of weapons and equipment on them.

Edited by Sniper31
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome video! It's amazing what we are capable of. Love NASA! 

 

On ‎2‎/‎26‎/‎2018 at 10:26 PM, Sniper31 said:

Well, for the 28 years that I have been in the military (mostly in the mighty 101st), we have never once had our gear weighed getting on a helicopter. When it comes to deployment flights, they will weigh our extra baggage that gets palletized (basically they just weigh the pallet) but they don't weigh all of our gear and weaponry that we carry on. And trust me, we carry much more than the average traveler with a 70lb suitcase. The typical modern day combat soldier carries over 150 lbs of weapons and equipment on them.

 

Thanks for your service Sniper, not sure if I could walk around w/ 150lbs on me for more than a few minutes.. LOL. Glad people like you can!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/26/2018 at 10:26 PM, Sniper31 said:

Well, for the 28 years that I have been in the military (mostly in the mighty 101st), we have never once had our gear weighed getting on a helicopter. When it comes to deployment flights, they will weigh our extra baggage that gets palletized (basically they just weigh the pallet) but they don't weigh all of our gear and weaponry that we carry on. And trust me, we carry much more than the average traveler with a 70lb suitcase. The typical modern day combat soldier carries over 150 lbs of weapons and equipment on them.

 

I have a neighbor who I wish you could meet. He was also in the 101st. He's retired a Sergeant Major but "back in the day" he was a Captain ( who was eventually RIF'd). The stories he tells me of his days on LRP during 1967-68 are almost impossible to believe...although I know they are true. God bless you guys..........Doug

Edited by Triplane
Edditted becuase i kant spel............
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, rmk83 said:

Awesome video! It's amazing what we are capable of. Love NASA! 

 

 

Thanks for your service Sniper, not sure if I could walk around w/ 150lbs on me for more than a few minutes.. LOL. Glad people like you can!

Thank you rmk83, much appreciated. Every light Infantry platoon always has a medic attached (corpsman in the USN and USMC) that carries a very similar amount of weight. What the medic doesn't carry in weaponry weight they make up for with medical supplies. Water weight from all the IV bags is the main culprit, but of course lots of other medical supplies too. We could not do our job without them. :) 

2 hours ago, Triplane said:

 

I have a neighbor who I wish you could meet. He was also in the 101st. He's retired a Sergeant Major but "back in the day" he was a Captain ( who was eventually RIF'd). The stories he tells me of his days on LRP during 1967-68 are almost impossible to believe...although I know they are true. God bless you guys..........Doug

 

I would love to sit down and chat with your neighbor too Triplane, I always love talking to combat veterans, from any nationality,  from before my military history started. Love swapping stories, and always learn lessons from them that matter today. I actually have about two years myself in a LRS (Long Range Surveillance) unit including nine months of combat time, which is the modern day descendant of the LRP units from Vietnam. We used many training and combat techniques passed down from them that still apply to this day. I will happily salute ANYONE who served during that conflict. Please tell your neighbor that this combat experienced 101st Light Infantry NCO virtually salutes him, and would be honored to share a cold brew with him, should that ever be made possible. :)  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Doc_Z said:

I served in Nam with the 1st Cav in 1965-66.  Didn't do any formal LRP, but did some recon work in places that had to remain nameless.

 

Well, my same comments to you then as well Doc-Z...a salute to you and cheers with a virtual cold one. I will never be able to thank you guys enough for the sacrifices made by you all that enabled support for my generation of service members. I never pass up an opportunity to thank you vets and render a proper salute :) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Truly amazing. Thank you for sharing this part of history. Gave me goose bumps just watching. God Bless all you chaps who have served. I tip my hat to you all. Thank you.

Ex military myself. 12 years service with medical discharge. RACT Royal Australian Corp of transport, Army.

 

Regards

 

Sam 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...
On 2/25/2018 at 9:12 AM, Triplane said:

Back in the days when the 747's were still new and unfamiliar to most of us, my mother bought a ticket to Europe. She later cancelled the trip because she learned there was a piano in the upstairs lounge and she was afraid the airplane would be too heavy to get off the ground. I swear this is a true story..........Doug

I'm not aware of any carrier other than American Airlines having electric pianos on board their 747s, and it wasn't on the upper deck but rather was in the rear coach lounge. AA did not fly 747s to Europe. I wonder if you're misremembering. Or, perhaps your mom thought the 747 she booked might have had a piano on board because AA ran TV commercials showing the 747 piano lounges.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...